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An aggregation of ratings from around the internet to offer one verdict: binge-worthy, or trash.

Movies and TV shows are famous for having inconsistent ratings: a film with 100% on Rotten Tomatoes can have 5 on IMDb, and vice versa. A TV show loved by viewers will be seen as predictable or nonworthy by critics.

There are even differences within viewer or critic ratings: the community on Letterboxd, a film social media site, rates very differently from IMDb. The Metacritic consensus often disagrees with Rotten Tomatoes.

This gets even more confusing when factoring in numbers: Letterboxd rates out of 5, IMDb out of 10, and Rotten Tomatoes out of 100.

So where does that leave audiences? And what is the consensus between all of these service?

Binge or Trash is meant to be a platform that reduces the noise to a binary rating: good or bad, binge or trash. Currently, it includes ratings from open-source projects such as Trakt, TMDb, and OMDb.

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